• Reed Pomeroy and Kara Little (JMSW 2015 Alumni) will be departing on June 30th, 2015 to Jinja, Uganda. We will be working with Hands Embracing All Lands (HEAL) Ministries using our social work skills and knowledge to expand their impact and connections within the Jinja Community. During our year long stay, we will primarily be working alongside HEAL’s Ugandan Social Worker in the greater community as well as within the James Place. We will have the privilege of serving orphans, widows, and abandoned women and children.  HEAL Ministries also offers Preschool Classes, English Classes, Business Classes, Bible Study, Farming God’s Way, Sewing and Crafts Classes, and Kid’s Club. Kid’s Club reaches out to over 300 children in the community every Saturday, offering a nutritious meal, among other activities. If you would like to learn more about our journey or find out ways to support us you may contact us at Reed Pomeroy (reed.pomeroy@gmail.com) or  Kara Little (kara.little05@gmail.com)
  • Africa Pic 2 Africa Pic
  • Suzanne Marin, a JMSW student, was featured in the Winston-Salem Journal.  Winston-Salem Journal: No Limits on Fun
  • Victoria Jones, a JMSW student, was featured on Fox 8 News.  Victoria is part of the Congregational Social Work Education Initiative.                                                Fox 8: College Students Collaborating with Greensboro IRC
  • Andrew Watkins, a JMSW student, Participated as a fellow in the prestigious Southern Education Leadership initiative sponsored Southern Education Foundation.                                                                                                        Southern Education: Fellow
  • Lauren Carter CSWE Conference Tampa Fl 2014Lauren Carter, a JMSW student, presented at the Council on Social Work Education Conference in Tampa, Fl. Her research focused on the use of text mining and sentiment analysis to investigate fathers’ narratives about their own fathers.  Text mining and sentiment analysis are data analysis methods used in the business sector to detect patterns and meaning in large sets of qualitative data. These methods were utilized in the analysis of father narratives collected during interviews in the Early Head Start Father Studies. Positive and negative words were given a value of (-1) and (1), respectively, and the sum of words used indicated either a positive or negative sentiment in the participant’s narrative. These scores were then used in a regression analysis with the total number of words used per answer to detect predictive patterns. It was found that as participants used more words, the sentiment of the answer was more positive.  The implications of the use of text mining and sentiment analysis in the social sciences are profound. These methods allow researchers to more efficiently analyze large sets of qualitative data, cutting down on labor and time spent on typical qualitative data analysis. Further, these methods add a supplementary quantitative aspect to qualitative research