PUBLIC HEALTH EDUCATION

School of Health and Human Sciences

Sheryl Coley, Dr.PH

Sheryl L. Coley, DrPH
Adjunct Professor
Phone: 336-334-5532

Brief Bio

PERSONAL INTRODUCTION

As a Greensboro native, my passion for helping women grew from observing my mother who worked for over 20 years as a clinic manager at the Guilford County Health Department. I was not called to be a nurse, but my desire to help women in some way, shape, or form never wavered. As a result, my work experience and community service centers around benefiting women’s health across the lifespan. Outside of work, I enjoy music, performing arts, creative writing, and good cooking.

PROFESSIONAL PROFILE

Dr. Sheryl Coley is an Adjunct Professor of Public Health Education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Dr. Coley’s community health research and evaluation projects in North Carolina and Wisconsin covered a diverse range of topics within women’s health and health disparities across the life course continuum. She partners with academic and public health departments and community organizations on health and social service initiatives with specific focus on examining disparities and supporting health equity for underserved populations such as African-Americans, Latinx and other immigrants, rural communities, and other marginalized communities.

EDUCATION

DrPH in Community Health Education, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro

MPH Community Health Education, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro

BS in Business Administration, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

CLASS SCHEDULE FALL 2022

HEA 202 – 02 Personal Health (online)

Research Interests

• Aging health disparities

• Caregiver-support program evaluation for marginalized populations

• Community-based participatory research

• Maternal and infant health

Selected Publications

Evans, E.E., Coley, S.L., Gooding, D.C., Norris, N., Ramsey, C.M., Green-Harris, G. & Mueller, K.D. (2021). Preliminary assessment of connected speech and language as marker for cognitive change in late middle-aged Black/African American adults at risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Aphasiology, 2021, 1-24. doi:10.1080/02687038.2021.1931801

Green-Harris, G., Coley, S.L., Koscik, R.L., Norris, N.C., Houston, S.L., Sager, M.A., Johnson, S.C., & Farrar Edwards, D. (2019). Addressing disparities in Alzheimer’s Disease and African-American participation in research: An asset-based community development approach. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 15, 125. doi:10.3389/fnagi.2019.00125.

Coley, S.L., Zapata, J., Schwei, R.J., Mihalovic, G., Matabele, M.N., Jacobs, E.A., & Anderson, C.K. (2017). More than a “number”: Perspectives of prenatal care quality from mothers of color and providers. Women’s Health Issues, S1049-3867(17)30104-4. doi:10.1016/j.whi.2017.10.014.

Coley, S.L., Mendes de Leon, C.F., Ward, E.C., Barnes, L.L., Skarupski, K.A., & Jacobs, E.A. (2017). Perceived discrimination and health-related quality of life: Exploring gender differences among older African Americans. 26(12), 3449-3458. doi: 10.1007/s11136-017-1663-9.

Coley, S.L., Nichols, T.R., Rulison, K.L., Aronson, R.E., Brown-Jeffy, S., & Morrison, S. (2015). Does neighborhood risk explain racial disparities in low birth weight among infants born to adolescent mothers? Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, 29(2):122-129.