HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY STUDIES

School of Health and Human Sciences

Jocelyn Smith

Jocelyn R. Smith Lee, PhD
PhD, University of Maryland, College Park
Email: jrsmithl@uncg.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Brief Bio

My community engaged program of research aims to enhance the health, development, and family relationships of Black boys and men. I study issues of violence (e.g. community violence; police killings), traumatic loss and bereavement, and healing among Black families. In particular, I examine the health disparity of homicide and work to understand how losing loved ones to violence shapes the health, well-being, success, and family relationships of Black males and their social networks. I take an interdisciplinary and trauma-informed approach to this work and utilize qualitative and mixed methodological strategies to center the voices of Black boys, men, and families in my research. As a trained couple and family therapist, I consider the implications of this work for both research and practice.

Selected Publications

  • Smith Lee, J. R. (In Press). Who gets to be a victim of gun violence?: Examining the marginalized trauma and grief of boys and men in Black families. National Council on
    Family Relations Winter Report.
  • Crosby, S. D., Patton, D. U., Duncan, D. T., Smith Lee, J. R. (In press). Framing neighborhood safety and academic success: Perspectives from high-achieving Black youth in Chicago. Children, Youth, and Environments.
  • Smith Lee, J. R. (2017). Healing from inner city violence. In L. Nelson & L. PadillaWalker (Eds.), Flourishing in emerging adulthood: Positive development during the third decade of life (pp. 491 – 509). New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Smith Lee, J. R. (2016). A trauma-informed approach to affirming the humanity of African American boys and supporting healthy transitions to manhood. In L. Burton, D. Burton, S. McHale, V. King, & J. Van Hook (Eds.), Boys and Men in African American Families (pp. 85 – 92). Switzerland: Springer.
  • Smith, J. R., & Patton, D. U. (2016). Posttraumatic stress symptoms in context: Examining trauma responses to violent exposure and homicide death among Black males in urban neighborhoods. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 86(2), 212 – 223. doi: 10.1037/ort0000101
  • Patton, D. U., Lane, J., Leonard, P., Macbeth, J., & Smith Lee, J. R. (2016). Gang violence on the digital street: Case study of a South Side Chicago gang member’s Twitter communication. New Media & Society, 1 – 19. doi: 10.1177/1461444815625949
  • Smith, J. R. (2015). Unequal burdens of loss: Examining the frequency and timing of homicide deaths experienced by young black men across the life course. American Journal of Public Health, 105(S3), S483-S490. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2014.302535. http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2014.302535
  • Assari, S., Smith, J. R., Caldwell, C. H., & Zimmerman, M. A. (2015). Longitudinal links between fear of neighborhood violence, parental support, and depressive symptoms among male and female African American emerging adults. Societies, 5, 151 – 170.
  • Roy, K., Messina, L., Smith, J. R., Waters, D.W. (2014). Growing up as man-of-the-house: Adultification and transition into adulthood for young men in economically
    disadvantaged families. In K. Roy & N. Jones (Eds.), Pathways to adulthood for disconnected young men in low-income communities. New Directions in Child and Adolescent Development, 143, 55 – 72.
  • Roy, K. & Smith, J. R. (2013). Nonresident fathers and intergenerational parenting in kin networks. In N. J. Cabrera & C. S. Tamis-LeMonda (Eds.), Handbook of Father Involvement, 2nd ed. (pp. 320 – 337). New York: Routledge.